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Hope for political change in Thailand has grown stronger in 2020 after a wave of student protests across the country followed the constitutional court’s dissolution of the opposition Future Forward Party. This wave of protests, dubbed the “youthquake” phenomenon, is reflective of the political awareness among the Thai youth. Despite the ban on public assembly, the youth have taken to platforms online and offline to vent out their frustrations. Online, however, the Thai youth continue to protest, using social media to voice out their criticisms against the government.

Songs in the local language of the Marapu community in East Sumba, Indonesia, have become a bridge for the Marapu community to directly communicate and receive information and relevant health recommendations from the World Health Organisation and national and local governments in a culturally familiar and appropriate context.

The Foundation for Media Alternatives, a Coconet community member, has published a new report, “State of the Digital Nation: The Digital Rights Report 2020”, that documents how human rights were impacted by technology and digital innovations in the country. The report is based on findings from January to December 2020.

Today, on the anniversary of the 2006 Thai coup, protesters will once again gather at Thammasat University in Bangkok, Thailand, to call for political changes and democratic reforms. Students as young as 14 years old have been at the forefront of the protests, with some groups demanding ten key reforms, among them the revocation of the lese-majeste law and the pardoning of all those jailed due to this law.